Winter Scene ~ Round Up In The Snow

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Photographer:  Ralph Palmer, Copyright Photo
Posted with permission

Two Year Old Saddles Up Miniature Pony ‘Maybelline’ To Compete in Rodeo

This ‘little big-man’ rodeo rider has caused a big stir in the gritty world of barrel racing.

The two 1/2 year old, Royce Gill, from Upper Horton in western New South Wales, Australia should be kicking up tantrums, but instead he is kicking up the dust on his six-year-old pony, Maybelline.

Even though Royce is still wearing diapers, it is no surprise that this young cowboy has taken to the sport of racing barrels at high-speeds.  He is the seventh-generation rodeo rider in his family.

Royce entered his first competition at the Beaudesert Rodeo in the ‘18 year and under’ classification.  Even though he did not win any ribbons in his first try, he has plenty of time to catch up with the much older competition.

His father, Ryan Gill, says his son was born with the passion, ‘I just sit him on and he wants to stay there.’

Mr. Gill, who lives in the country on a 3000-acre property, states that he will help his son move on to bigger calves and ponies as he grows up.

In the meantime, the pint-sized rodeo rider has a busy schedule.  Royce will continue to compete in barrel racing against riders more than seven times his age.

Like father, like son, Royce Gill is sure to follow in the footsteps of his father Ryan who is a champion rodeo rider

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Re-written from News Sources

Photo Credit: Jamie Hanson Newspix

Fall Scene: Cattle Drive

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Published in: on October 28, 2008 at 8:35 am  Comments (8)  
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Winter Scene ~ Back Home, Again

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Rancher On Horseback Finishes Ride Across America

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Bill Inman atop his horse Blackie
as riders in Hendersonville, N.C. welcome him

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January 13, 2008

 An Oregon rancher who set off on a cross-country horseback ride seven months ago in search of what’s good in America dismounted Sunday, feeling encouraged by the spirit and stories of the people he met.

Bill Inman began his journey June 2 because he felt distress over how the country was being portrayed in news coverage and on TV shows. He rode his 16-year-old thoroughbred-quarter horse Blackie.

His wife, Brenda, and a four-person support crew joined him on the trip through eight states.

Along the way, Inman collected stories of hardworking, honest everyday people in rural America.

His cross cross-country trek was dubbedUncovering America by Horseback, a website that noted his experiences, including videos.

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The scenery in America is changing and I’m really proud we took snapshots at slow motion of this time period because 20 years from now it will be different,” he said.

Inman talks about the retired rancher in Idaho who he considers “a true image of America with his honesty and hospitality,” or people he’s met working multiple jobs to make ends meet, or another Idaho rancher e-mailing the progress of the journey to his son in Iraq.

“There is nothing like riding across the nation to learn about the people of this country,” he said.

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Among the people he met was a Wyoming deputy sheriff who drove 25 miles through a thunderstorm to bring dinner to him and his wife, and all 17 people of a Colorado town who came out to see him ride off.

An Idaho state trooper paid him $20 for the chance to sit on top of Blackie, he said.

“Sometimes, I was more intrigued by the stories they were telling than the stories I was telling,” Inman said.

Inman finished his trip riding into the southwestern North Carolina town under overcast skies. A crowd of more than 100 people greeted Inman as he ended the journey.

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Crossing the plains of Kansas

“I don’t know if that’s really sunk in yet. It may take me two or three days to think it’s over,” Inman said in a telephone interview.

Inman ticked off a list of what’s been bad about the trip — temperatures ranging from 108 degrees to freezing, pesky insects, water shortages, crossing mountains and desert and riding in a lightning storm. People aren’t on the list.

“I haven’t run into any bad people,” he said.

Inman bought Blackie in 2001. The two have clearly bonded.

“I know his capabilities and I know his flaws and I think he can say the same thing for me,” he said.  “Now if you think we’re constantly kissing buddies, I don’t think so.

Do I brag about him a lot? Yeah.”

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Re-written from news sources:

Winter Scene ~ Day’s End

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Photographer: Kai Eiselein

Original Source:

Little Miss Cool

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The Great Santa Fe Trail Horse Race

LINK
The Great Santa Fe Trail Horse Ride – 2008 

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The Great Santa Fe Trail Horse Ride
Updates


The Great Santa Fe Trail Horse Ride – 2007

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 The Great Santa Fe Trail Horse Race is an 800 mile endurance ride completed over a 13 day period. It is open to all breeds.

The ride will start in Santa Fe, New Mexico on September 3, 2007 and end in Missouri on September 15, 2007

One of the main objectives of the race is to educate the public not only on the national historic Santa Fe Trail, but also to introduce the sport of endurance riding to thousands.

One Hundred teams will spend each evening in the race village where over 100,000 spectators are expected to visit throughout the entire course of the event.

The riders will complete the specified distance for the day then stop and spend the night at the race village. Each rider’s time will be recorded, and accumulated for end of the race.

The rider with the shortest time overall will be declared the winner.  In addition to an individual winner, team competition will exist.

Spectators are encouraged to turn out to greet the riders at “race villages,” which will be overnight stopping points for the riders and their horses. 

Santa Fe, N.M., Sept. 1-2

Las Vegas, N.M., Sept. 3

Springer, N.M., Sept. 4

Clayton, N.M., Sept. 5

Elkhart, Kan., Sept. 6

Dodge City, Kan., Sept. 7-8

Larned, Kan., Sept. 9

Lyons, Kan., Sept. 10

Council Grove, Kan., Sept. 11-12

Burlingame, Kan., Sept. 13

Gardner, Kan., Sept. 14-15.

Link: Great Santa Fe Trail Horse Race

Link:  Old West Legends ~ Santa Fe Trail

Link:  News Report

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Cattle Drive Joins Surfers On California Beach

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Surf meets hoof as board-toting beachgoer navigates a path through the cowboys and their herd.

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The usual early morning sight along the wide white beaches in Huntington Beach, California are surfers, surfers and more surfers.    

That was until a few days ago when the coastal cattle drive hit town.

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Myron Arnold said he knew something was different Thursday morning when he drove down Pacific Coast Highway in Huntington Beach. “It wasn’t salty air and it wasn’t suntan lotion.”  It was, well,  another aroma.

Forty cowboys and nine cattle dogs led 100 steers down a 1 1/2 -mile stretch of sand in Huntington Beach at 7 a.m., a time of day usually reserved for surfers and joggers.  

And so it was that Surf City was transformed into Cow Town, if only for an hour. 

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The surf-and-hoof event at the Huntington Beach Pier was meant to promote both the Orange County Fair and the U.S. Open of Surfing, an annual tournament taking place just south of the city’s historic pier.

Marketing intentions aside, the sights and sounds and smells of a cattle run in a city best known for its legendary surf created more than a little excitement.

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Crowds viewed the herd from a beachside path on a bluff as the bovine brigade shuffled south toward the pier. 

No fewer than four news helicopters documented the cattle drive.

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“We’re the herd following the herd,” said Rick Henn, 48, a mail carrier from Huntington Beach who took the day off to see the cattle with his wife, Beth. 

The cowboys, sporting Stetsons, jeans, boots and bandannas, wore wraparound sunglasses and tropical shirts.

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One of them, Robert Kidd, a former resident of Huntington Beach, said herding cattle on the beach was an age-old tradition. So much so that his four-member team of wranglers call themselves the Long Board Cowboys.

“This used to be cattle country right here,” he said from atop a mule. “I left Huntington Beach in a Chevy in ’66 and came back on a mule.

That mule wore a black banner reading, “Never Surf Downstream From the Herd.”

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After the bovine sand parade, the cowboys and cattle dogs herded their Longhorns away from the U.S. Open of Surfing and on to less sandy pastures.

Story: Los Angeles Times